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The International Trade Mark Registration Process – Infographic

If you are thinking about expanding your business to other countries, or run an online business that can be accessed by people all over the world, then you may want to think about protecting your brand with international trade marks. If your business isn’t protected, then someone else abroad could either leverage the status of your brand to help their business, or damage your brand’s reputation by using your name on a business with inferior product or poor business practices.

To register an international trade mark, you have to apply to each country individually, however this can be managed centrally through the Madrid System from the WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organisation.) The process is still lengthy, taking 12-18 months depending on the country, but considerable amounts of time and money are saved by using the centralised Madrid System compared to separate applications.

The international trade mark application process is quite complex, so we have created the following infographic to help explain it.

Infographic displaying the international trademark process

The Trade Mark Registration Process In The UK – Infographic

A flow chart of the trade mark process in the UK

Trade marks registration can be a complicated process. This is why the entire process can take between 4 to 5 months. There is no guarantee that the trade mark will be registered, but if clear guide lines are followed and a trade mark attorney is involved, your trade mark has a good chance of being filed. A trade mark is in essence your brand. It has to be unique for it to be registered. A registered trade mark gives the owner legal rights to take action against others who use the brand name without permission. Trade mark protection is limited to the country where the trade mark has been registered.

If you trade in the UK only, then you should register a trade mark in the UK. The infographic below shows the trade mark registration process in the UK.

A flow chart of the trade mark process in the UK

The Trade Mark Registration Process In The EU – Infographic (Updated)

Flow chart of the EU trademark
From the 23rd of March, there have been changes to the EU trade mark registration process. This post has been updated to reflect those changes.

The European Union (EU) provides business owners an opportunity to register a trade mark in all the member states of the EU through a EU Trade Mark. The process has some similarities to the UK trade mark registration process. The registration process takes between 5 to 8 months and gives the trade mark owner legal rights to take action against others who use the brand name without permission.

If you trade in the EU, or looking to expand into the EU then you should register a EU trade mark. The infographic below shows the trade mark registration process in the EU.

The EU trademark process displayed in a flow chart.

The Patent Registration Process In The UK – Infographic

A flow chart of the patent registration process in the UK

A patent is used to protect an invention. It gives the owner complete ownership of an invention and the right to take legal action anyone who uses, sells or copies the inventions without permission. The ownership usually lasts for 20 years.

A patent application can take a long time (3 to 4 years) to get registered. There are also conditions which need to be met for a patent to get registered. These conditions are listed as follows:

– the invention should have some new characteristic, which should be verified by industry experts
– the invention should introduce an “inventive step” or a “non-obvious” function, which haven’t been introduced by industry experts before
– the invention must be capable of being used for an industrial or business purpose
– some things are not patentable in the UK for e.g. scientific theories, mathematical methods, discoveries of natural substances, computer programs etc.
– the invention should be described in a clear and complete manner in the application; another technical expert should be able to recreate it using the description

The infographic below shows the process of registering a patent in the UK.

A flow chart of the patent registration process in the UK

 

Whats the difference between copyright, trade marks, patents and registered designs?

Copyright, trade marks, patents and registered designs - whats the difference?

IP is essentially a person’s work that needs to be protected so that no one else can financially benefit or gain recognition for the work. There are four types of intellectual property (IP) which are listed as follows:

  • Copyright – Protection automatically granted to authors for their original, creative or intellectual work
  • Trade mark – A sign that distinguishes a brand from its competitors; the sign could be a word, logo or slogan
  • Patent – Protection for a new invention that hasn’t been introduced in the market yet
  • Registered designs – Protection for the appearance/design of a product

View the infographic below to see the difference between the four types of intellectual property.

Copyright, trade marks, patents and registered designs - whats the difference?